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Dr. Garfinkel Purchases New Digital Ultrasound

Dr. Garfinkel Purchases New Digital Ultrasound

As with most electronic technology, things are constantly being improved. Ultrasound machines are no exception! My new U/S is absolutely tiny when compared to my old machine, but the screen size and image size are nearly identical. The new machine operates on a rechargeable battery which means I can now scan anywhere. No more squinting in the bright noon sunshine to try and make out an image on the screen, no more creative surgery towel shade tents to block the glare. I can easily move the patient into a stall, or into any available shade and get a fantastic image. I can now display past and current images side-by-side which immediately highlights any changes. This little powerhouse does so much more too. I'm really looking forward to scanning all the things  I currently have both reproductive and tendon probes which will allow a wide range of scanning options.

Stem Cell Therapy

Stem Cell Therapy

Stem cells are, essentially, immature cells that can transform into whatever kind of cell (e.g., cartilage, muscle, skin, tendon) they're prompted to become, potentially helping in¬jured tissues heal. Veterinarians can use one of two types of stem cell tissues in horses: bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal cells (BMO-MSCs) and adipose-derived stem cells. Practitioners collect BMO-MSCs from the horse's sternum or pelvis and then culture and expand them in a lab over time to obtain enough cells to implant back into the horse for treatment. They harvest adipose-derived cells from a few different areas on the horse's body; however, the most common place is the hindquarters-particularly. from the fat located near the horse's tailhead.

Once enough stem cells have proliferated in culture dishes, veterinarians administer the cells in two ways: directly into a horse's lesion or through an intravenous catheter in a nearby area. Once inside the body, the stem cells are drawn to the affected area and then "recruit" cells in the surrounding areas of the body to aid in tissue regeneration and repair.

Thrush

Thrush

Thrush is a degenerative condition primarily affecting the sulci (clefts) of the frog. The horny material of the frog softens and disintegrates. A foul odor and black discharge are commonly seen in affected areas of the frog. Horses with narrow feet or those kept in damp, dirty conditions are most often affected. Thrush can also occur in dry conditions.

Thrush begins in the depths of the frog sulci and may not be obvious. If ignored or undetected, it can progress to undermine the entire frog. Treatment is simple and usually curative if thrush is detected early. Severe, advanced thrush often requires repeated trimming away of dead tissue.

Equine Rabies

Rabies is a viral disease that affects the central nervous system. Once an animal is infected, the disease is fatal. In animals, rabies is usually found in wildlife populations, such as skunks, bats, raccoons and foxes. The virus is spread by the bite of a rabid animal or entry of saliva from an infected animal through a break in the skin.

 

Pulmonary Hemorrhage

Pulmonary Hemorrhage

Exercise-induced pulmonary hemorrhage (EIPH) is a respiratory condition characterized by bleeding into the lungs or out of the nose during exercise. The condition most commonly affects horses involved in sports that require explosive bouts of exercise (e.g., racehorses, polo ponies, eventers), and it can negatively impact performance.


HAVE YOU HEARD THE BUZZ IN THE BARN?

HAVE YOU HEARD THE BUZZ IN THE BARN?

Boehringer Ingelheim Vetmedica, Inc. (BIVI), is looking for PRASCEND success stories and we are encouraging horse owners along with veterinarians to enter our Barn Buzz Testimonial Contest.

From May 1 to July 31, 2014 horse owners can submit their PRASCEND success story at www.buzzinthebarn.com to be considered a finalists.

Owners will be asked to fill out a form at www.buzzinthebarn.com and upload before and after treatment photos to be considered a finalist. Horse owners will need to provide the following information:

• Horse's name
• Horse's age (at diagnosis)
• Horse's current age
• Breed
• What clinical signs were exhibited prior to diagnosis
• Description of what improvements were noticed
• Veterinarian name
• Veterinarian clinic name
• Veterinarian phone number

Important Safety Information: PRASCEND is for use in horses only. PRASCEND has not been evaluated in breeding, pregnant, or lactating horses and may interfere with reproductive hormones in these horses.PRASCEND Tablets should not be crushed due to the potential for increased human exposure.

The Lameness Scale

The American Association of Equine Practitioners has developed a grading scale (0-5) so that all horsemen and veterinarians can use the same criteria for describing a lameness.

A sound horse is given the lowest score, 0. Grade 1 refers to "lameness that is difficult to observe and is not consistently apparent, regardless of circumstances." Grade 2 lameness is "difficult to observe at a walk or when trotting in a straight line, but consistently apparent under certain circumstances." Lameness that is "consistently observable at a trot under all circumstances" is given a Grade 3, and lameness that is "obvious at the walk" is given a Grade 4. Grade 5 is reserved for lameness that "produces minimal weight bearing in motion and/or at rest, or a complete inability to move."